Coronavirus Australia: Eid with a difference for Sydney's Muslim community"

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For Sarah Saboune Dalati, Eid al-Fitr is usually celebrated with the coming together of 50 of her relatives from all around Sydney.

Omar and Sarah Dalati at home preparing for tomorrow's Eid celebrations with daughter Mariam 8, Aaminah 6 and 3 1/2 year old twins Yusuf and Adam.

Omar and Sarah Dalati at home preparing for tomorrow's Eid celebrations with daughter Mariam 8, Aaminah 6 and 3 1/2 year old twins Yusuf and Adam.Credit:Dean Sewell

But for the Georges Hall woman and her family, the festivities marking the end of the month-long dawn-to-dusk fasting of Ramadan this year will be a little more subdued.

"Usually the whole generation comes over to my in-laws. Tomorrow morning everyone would be there, but this time that won’t be happening," Mrs Dalati said on Saturday.

Family-run Al Fayhaa Bakery preparing for Eid during the coronavirus pandemic.

Family-run Al Fayhaa Bakery preparing for Eid during the coronavirus pandemic.Credit:Dean Sewell

"That is going to be a big, big change for us."

With social distancing restrictions making large family and religious gatherings impossible, Sydney's Islamic community is remaining close via social media.

Omar and Sarah Dalati at home preparing for Sunday's Eid celebrations.

Omar and Sarah Dalati at home preparing for Sunday's Eid celebrations.Credit:Dean Sewell

While the family would usually begin celebrations by going to pray at Lakemba Mosque, then onto Roberts Park in Greenacre, before visiting relatives over three days, prayers will this time be video broadcast from 7am, with the Dalatis going on to have breakfast together at home before exchanging gifts.

"We're taking it in our stride," Mrs Dalati said, adding she was putting balloons around the house to keep the children excited.

Meanwhile, the family-run Al Fayhaa Bakery in Lakemba is still expecting a queue despite the mosque remaining closed on Sunday.

Owner Samir Daher said the community members had been supporting one another during the pandemic, with a bit of excitement now arriving with the festivities as party orders and preparations are made.

"We don’t know what we're expecting, it's the first time this kind of thing has happened, so it's exciting to see what's going to happen," Mr Daher said.

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